War Paint and the amazing women that changed the world of beauty

I love the theatre. I’m sure my passion for dance and performance plays into that and I recently saw the amazing show, War Paint.

The show tells the story of two beauty industry icons and rivals, Helena Rubinstein and Elizabeth Arden.

Both women founded cosmetic companies in the early 1900s and found massive success on their journeys.

Women leaders today can take a look at these dynamic women and gain inspiration and confidence that they can do whatever they dream.

Rubinstein was the oldest in a family of eight girls and made her way to Australia from Poland in her early 20s. She began working on a beauty cream formula, after her own mother had given her some to take on her trip, and by 1902 she was opening her first salon. She figured out that different skin types required different products and that was a huge discovery for that era.

Next it was on to Paris, where a few of her sisters worked with her and they were supporting their family back in Poland. Make-up was developed there and soon she found herself opening a salon in New York City, where her name and brand became very well-known. Her husband even wrote advertisements for her. Her business survived through The Wall Street Crash and two World Wars. She was a pioneer, always a step ahead in the world of beauty. She wasn’t afraid of trying innovative ideas like creating hormone creams or beauty products for men. She loved the industry and she made it her life’s work.

The youngest of five children, Florence Nightingale Graham, (later Elizabeth Arden) was born in Canada to a family that struggled financially. She eventually moved to New York and worked with her brother in the pharmaceutical industry. This is where she learned about skincare.

She opened The Red Door Salon in 1910 in New York City and would ultimately open salons internationally, in places like Paris, Rome and Hong Kong. She helped women see that make-up was not for the lower class (a thought at the times) that it was beautiful and ladylike, if applied correctly. The “makeover” was a concept started in her salons. Her business survived the Great Depression and at the top of her career, she was one of the wealthiest women in the world.

I encourage you to read more about both of these women.

The takeaway is simple. They had dreams, they had ideas, they had information to share and at the time, it wasn’t always information people were ready to hear. They were so ahead of their time and many of the beauty techniques we enjoy today, came from the research and creativity of these powerhouses.

If your idea seems outlandish right now, think about these women.
If you don’t think you can do it, think about these women.
If you’re scared, think about these women.

They were able to build empires at a time when women leaders were scarce. We live in a different time. This is our time.

Embrace your power as a woman and lead. Make decisions. Try new things. Fail. Get back up. Try again. Someone might be writing a newsletter about you and your company in 50 years.

We can’t accept this any longer

Women. We’ve been in the news and on the news a lot lately. There’s so much going on in the world and no matter your political views, one thing is certain…we all should be treated equally in the workplace.

Think about your own life.

Have you accepted a position at a lower pay grade than you expected because you feared confrontation?

Have you taken on a client at a lesser rate because you didn’t want to negotiate?

Have you decreased your prices because you weren’t confident in your value and worth?

We earn less and we accept it. And that has to stop. It has been said that women entrepreneurs even pay themselves less than male entrepreneurs. It is time to step up and charge our value, pay ourselves our worth and negotiate jobs at what we deserve.

Confidence is usually the factor holding us back. We have a little voice inside of us that tells us not to be dramatic or not to take things too personally. We need to tune that voice out and instead start using our real voice and be heard.

As women, we are natural nurturers, which sometimes leads to us giving more than expected and not stepping up and asking for what we are worth.

We own our responsibilities.

Our work ethic is strong.

Our dedication to what we do is fierce.

We control our own destiny.

As we stand up individually, we will be standing up together. Understand and ask for your value. You are worth it.

If you’re struggling with value or finding your way as you navigate changes in your business, reach out to me at support@slatersuccesscoaching.com. Let’s have a conversation and talk about it.

Head on over to the SSC Facebook or LinkedIn page and tell me something you commit to doing in 2017 to stand up and get paid!