They aren’t that bad…

They were rooting for Cal.

We were rooting for USC.

Fierce rivals we may have been, but it was still friendly competition.

The end result wasn’t what mattered. We were all there, supporting our team, purely loving the game and the sense of community in the stands.

Just like a football team has a rival, you may have a “rival” or two in business. We are not unique in what we do. Sure, we all have our own processes, systems, programs, methods, but we aren’t alone in our profession.

It takes me back to the days of my printing company, Slater Graphics. For the last decade of my time there, I shared an amazing collaborative relationship with a great friend and business associate. We shared an office, built a team together and supported one another in our respective businesses.

We openly talked about what would happen if we ended up vying for the same account, which was very realistic. We knew that our priority would always be the friendship and we would support each other no matter the scenario. We were both working parents and we got the day-to-day struggles that came along with running a household and running a business. There was mutual respect.

As a business and executive coach today, I enjoy many close relationships with other coaches. I don’t see it as a rivalry or competition. I see alliances. I see a group of people who want to help others reach new levels in their careers and businesses. I’m happy to be a part of that.

I’ve learned from my colleagues, as I know they have learned from me. Whether you’re an entrepreneur or leading a corporate team, I encourage you to create alliances with your “competition.” I encourage you to work together, toward the common goal.

Two heads are better than one is not just a saying. It’s absolutely true.

Share with me your stories on creating strong relationships and alliances with your colleagues and the difference it made in your life.

Feel free to reach out anytime to support@slatersuccesscoaching.com to continue the conversation.